Breadcrumb (BreadcrumbList) structured data

A breadcrumb trail on a page indicates the page's position in the site hierarchy, and it may help users understand and explore a site effectively. A user can navigate all the way up in the site hierarchy, one level at a time, by starting from the last breadcrumb in the breadcrumb trail.

Breadcrumb displayed on a web page

How to add structured data

Structured data is a standardized format for providing information about a page and classifying the page content. If you're new to structured data, you can learn more about how structured data works.

Here's an overview of how to build, test, and release structured data.

  1. Add the required properties. Based on the format you're using, learn where to insert structured data on the page.
  2. Follow the guidelines.
  3. Validate your code using the Rich Results Test and fix any critical errors. Consider also fixing any non-critical issues that may be flagged in the tool, as they can help improve the quality of your structured data (however, this isn't necessary to be eligible for rich results).
  4. Deploy a few pages that include your structured data and use the URL Inspection tool to test how Google sees the page. Be sure that your page is accessible to Google and not blocked by a robots.txt file, the noindex tag, or login requirements. If the page looks okay, you can ask Google to recrawl your URLs.
  5. To keep Google informed of future changes, we recommend that you submit a sitemap. You can automate this with the Search Console Sitemap API.

Examples

Google Search uses breadcrumb markup in the body of a web page to categorize the information from the page in search results. Often, as illustrated in following use cases, users can arrive at a page from very different types of search queries. While each search may return the same web page, the breadcrumb categorizes the content within the context of the Google Search query. The page ancillaryjustice.html might display the following breadcrumb trails depending upon the search context.

Single breadcrumb trail

A search query for a year and genre-based award, "2014 Nebula Award best novel", may generate the following breadcrumb:

Books Science Fiction Award Winners

JSON-LD

Here's an example in JSON-LD to support that breadcrumb:


<html>
  <head>
    <title>Award Winners</title>
    <script type="application/ld+json">
    {
      "@context": "https://schema.org",
      "@type": "BreadcrumbList",
      "itemListElement": [{
        "@type": "ListItem",
        "position": 1,
        "name": "Books",
        "item": "https://example.com/books"
      },{
        "@type": "ListItem",
        "position": 2,
        "name": "Science Fiction",
        "item": "https://example.com/books/sciencefiction"
      },{
        "@type": "ListItem",
        "position": 3,
        "name": "Award Winners"
      }]
    }
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
  </body>
</html>

RDFa

Here's an example in RDFa to support that breadcrumb:


<html>
  <head>
    <title>Award Winners</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <ol vocab="https://schema.org/" typeof="BreadcrumbList">
      <li property="itemListElement" typeof="ListItem">
        <a property="item" typeof="WebPage"
            href="https://example.com/books">
          <span property="name">Books</span></a>
        <meta property="position" content="1">
      </li>
      ›
      <li property="itemListElement" typeof="ListItem">
        <a property="item" typeof="WebPage"
            href="https://example.com/books/sciencefiction">
          <span property="name">Science Fiction</span></a>
        <meta property="position" content="2">
      </li>
      ›
      <li property="itemListElement" typeof="ListItem">
        <span property="name">Award Winners</span>
        <meta property="position" content="3">
      </li>
    </ol>
  </body>
</html>

Microdata

Here's an example in Microdata to support that breadcrumb:


<html>
  <head>
    <title>Award Winners</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <ol itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/BreadcrumbList">
      <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope
          itemtype="https://schema.org/ListItem">
        <a itemprop="item" href="https://example.com/books">
            <span itemprop="name">Books</span></a>
        <meta itemprop="position" content="1" />
      </li>
      ›
      <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope
          itemtype="https://schema.org/ListItem">
        <a itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/WebPage"
           itemprop="item" itemid="https://example.com/books/sciencefiction"
           href="https://example.com/books/sciencefiction">
          <span itemprop="name">Science Fiction</span></a>
        <meta itemprop="position" content="2" />
      </li>
      ›
      <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope
          itemtype="https://schema.org/ListItem">
        <span itemprop="name">Award winners</span>
        <meta itemprop="position" content="3" />
      </li>
    </ol>
  </body>
</html>

HTML

Here's an example of an HTML breadcrumb block within the page as part of the visual design.

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Award Winners</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <ol>
      <li>
        <a href="https://www.example.com/books">Books</a>
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="https://www.example.com/sciencefiction">Science Fiction</a>
      </li>
      <li>
        Award Winners
      </li>
    </ol>
  </body>
</html>

Multiple breadcrumb trail

If there are multiple ways to navigate to a page on your site, you can specify multiple breadcrumb trails for a single page. Here's one breadcrumb trail that leads to a page for award winning books:

Books Science Fiction Award Winners

Here's the another breadcrumb trail that leads to the same page:

Literature Award Winners

JSON-LD

Here's the example JSON-LD that supports multiple breadcrumb trails:


<html>
  <head>
    <title>Award Winners</title>
    <script type="application/ld+json">
    [{
      "@context": "https://schema.org",
      "@type": "BreadcrumbList",
      "itemListElement": [{
        "@type": "ListItem",
        "position": 1,
        "name": "Books",
        "item": "https://example.com/books"
      },{
        "@type": "ListItem",
        "position": 2,
        "name": "Science Fiction",
        "item": "https://example.com/books/sciencefiction"
      },{
        "@type": "ListItem",
        "position": 3,
        "name": "Award Winners"
      }]
    },
    {
      "@context": "https://schema.org",
      "@type": "BreadcrumbList",
      "itemListElement": [{
        "@type": "ListItem",
        "position": 1,
        "name": "Literature",
        "item": "https://example.com/literature"
      },{
        "@type": "ListItem",
        "position": 2,
        "name": "Award Winners"
      }]
    }]
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
  </body>
</html>

RDFa

Here's the example RDFa that supports multiple breadcrumb trails:


<html>
  <head>
    <title>Award Winners</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <ol vocab="https://schema.org/" typeof="BreadcrumbList">
      <li property="itemListElement" typeof="ListItem">
        <a property="item" typeof="WebPage"
            href="https://example.com/books">
          <span property="name">Books</span></a>
        <meta property="position" content="1">
      </li>
      ›
      <li property="itemListElement" typeof="ListItem">
        <a property="item" typeof="WebPage"
            href="https://example.com/books/sciencefiction">
          <span property="name">Science Fiction</span></a>
        <meta property="position" content="2">
      </li>
      ›
      <li property="itemListElement" typeof="ListItem">
        <a property="item" typeof="WebPage"
            href="https://example.com/books/sciencefiction/awardwinners">
          <span property="name">Award Winners</span></a>
        <meta property="position" content="3">
      </li>
    </ol>
    <ol vocab="https://schema.org/" typeof="BreadcrumbList">
      <li property="itemListElement" typeof="ListItem">
        <a property="item" typeof="WebPage"
            href="https://example.com/literature">
          <span property="name">Literature</span></a>
        <meta property="position" content="1">
      </li>
      ›
      <li property="itemListElement" typeof="ListItem">
        <span property="name">Award Winners</span>
        <meta property="position" content="2">
      </li>
    </ol>
  </body>
</html>

Microdata

Here's the example Microdata that supports multiple breadcrumb trails:


<html>
  <head>
    <title>Award Winners</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <ol itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/BreadcrumbList">
      <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope
          itemtype="https://schema.org/ListItem">
        <a itemprop="item" href="https://example.com/books">
            <span itemprop="name">Books</span></a>
        <meta itemprop="position" content="1" />
      </li>
      ›
      <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope
          itemtype="https://schema.org/ListItem">
        <a itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/WebPage"
           itemprop="item" itemid="https://example.com/books/sciencefiction"
           href="https://example.com/books/sciencefiction">
          <span itemprop="name">Science Fiction</span></a>
        <meta itemprop="position" content="2" />
      </li>
      ›
      <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope
          itemtype="https://schema.org/ListItem">
        <a itemprop="item" href="https://example.com/books/sciencefiction/awardwinners">
          <span itemprop="name">Award Winners</span></a>
        <meta itemprop="position" content="3" />
      </li>
    </ol>
    <ol itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/BreadcrumbList">
      <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope
          itemtype="https://schema.org/ListItem">
        <a itemprop="item" href="https://example.com/literature">
          <span itemprop="name">Literature</span></a>
        <meta itemprop="position" content="1" />
      </li>
      ›
      <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope
          itemtype="https://schema.org/ListItem">
        <span itemprop="name">Award Winners</span>
        <meta itemprop="position" content="2" />
      </li>
    </ol>
  </body>
</html>

HTML

Here's an example of an HTML breadcrumb block within the page as part of the visual design.

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Award Winners</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <ol>
      <li>
        <a href="https://www.example.com/books">Books</a>
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="https://www.example.com/books/sciencefiction">Science Fiction</a>
      </li>
      <li>
        Award Winners
      </li>
    </ol>
    <ol>
      <li>
        <a href="https://www.example.com/literature">Literature</a>
      </li>
      <li>
        Award Winners
      </li>
    </ol>
  </body>
</html>

Guidelines

You must follow these guidelines to be eligible to appear with breadcrumbs in Google Search.

We recommend providing breadcrumbs that represent a typical user path to a page, instead of mirroring the URL structure. Some parts of the URL path don't help people understand how the page fits in your website. For example, given the URL https://example.com/pages/books/catcher_in_the_rye.html, the pages path in the URL doesn't add any information, and neither does the top level element example.com.

Structured data type definitions

To specify breadcrumbs, define a BreadcrumbList that contains at least two ListItems. You must include the required properties for your content to be eligible for display with breadcrumbs.

BreadcrumbList is the container item that holds all elements in the list. The full definition of BreadcrumbList is available at schema.org/BreadcrumbList. The Google-supported properties are the following:

Required properties
itemListElement

ListItem

An array of breadcrumbs listed in a specific order. Specify each breadcrumb with a ListItem. For example:

{
"@context": "https://schema.org",
"@type": "BreadcrumbList",
  "itemListElement": [{
    "@type": "ListItem",
    "position": 1,
    "name": "Books",
    "item": "https://example.com/books"
  },{
    "@type": "ListItem",
    "position": 2,
    "name": "Authors",
    "item": "https://example.com/books/authors"
  },{
    "@type": "ListItem",
    "position": 3,
    "name": "Ann Leckie",
    "item": "https://example.com/books/authors/annleckie"
  }]
}

ListItem

ListItem contains details about an individual item in the list. The full definition of ListItem is available at schema.org/ListItem. The Google-supported properties are the following:

Required properties
item

URL or a subtype of Thing

The URL to the webpage that represents the breadcrumb. There are two ways to specify item:

  • URL: Specify the URL of the page. For example:
    "item": "https://example.com/books"
  • Thing: Use an id to specify the URL based on the markup format you're using:
    • JSON-LD: Use @id to specify the URL.
    • Microdata: You can use href or itemid to specify the URL.
    • RDFa: You can use about, href, or resource to specify the URL.

If the breadcrumb is the last item in the breadcrumb trail, item is not required. If item isn't included for the last item, Google uses the URL of the containing page.

name

Text

The title of the breadcrumb displayed for the user. If you're using a Thing with a name instead of a URL to specify item, then name is not required.

position

Integer

The position of the breadcrumb in the breadcrumb trail. Position 1 signifies the beginning of the trail.

使用 Search Console 监控富媒体搜索结果

Search Console 是一款工具,可帮助您监控网页在 Google 搜索结果中的显示效果。即使没有注册 Search Console,您的网页也可能会显示在 Google 搜索结果中,但注册 Search Console 能够帮助您了解 Google 如何查看您的网站并做出相应的改进。建议您在以下情况下查看 Search Console:

  1. 首次部署结构化数据后
  2. 发布新模板或更新代码后
  3. 定期分析流量时

首次部署结构化数据后

等 Google 将网页编入索引后,请在相关的富媒体搜索结果状态报告中查看是否存在问题。 理想情况下,有效项目数量会增加,而无效项目数量不会增加。如果您发现结构化数据存在问题,请执行以下操作:

  1. 修正无效项目
  2. 检查实际网址,核实问题是否仍然存在。
  3. 使用状态报告请求验证

发布新模板或更新代码后

如果对网站进行重大更改,请监控结构化数据无效项目的增幅。
  • 如果您发现无效项目增多了,可能是因为您推出的某个新模板无法正常工作,或者您的网站以一种新的错误方式与现有模板交互。
  • 如果您发现有效项目减少了(但无效项目的增加情况并不对应),可能是因为您的网页中未再嵌入结构化数据。请通过网址检查工具了解导致此问题的原因。

定期分析流量时

请使用效果报告分析您的 Google 搜索流量。数据将显示您的网页在 Google 搜索结果中显示为富媒体搜索结果的频率、用户点击该网页的频率以及网页在搜索结果中的平均排名。您还可以使用 Search Console API 自动提取这些结果。

Troubleshooting

If you're having trouble implementing or debugging structured data, here are some resources that may help you.

  • If you're using a content management system (CMS) or someone else is taking care of your site, ask them to help you. Make sure to forward any Search Console message that details the issue to them.
  • Google does not guarantee that features that consume structured data will show up in search results. For a list of common reasons why Google may not show your content in a rich result, see the General Structured Data Guidelines.
  • You might have an error in your structured data. Check the list of structured data errors.
  • If you received a structured data manual action against your page, the structured data on the page will be ignored (although the page can still appear in Google Search results). To fix structured data issues, use the Manual Actions report.
  • Review the guidelines again to identify if your content isn't compliant with the guidelines. The problem can be caused by either spammy content or spammy markup usage. However, the issue may not be a syntax issue, and so the Rich Results Test won't be able to identify these issues.
  • Troubleshoot missing rich results / drop in total rich results.
  • Allow time for re-crawling and re-indexing. Remember that it may take several days after publishing a page for Google to find and crawl it. For general questions about crawling and indexing, check the Google Search crawling and indexing FAQ.
  • Post a question in the Google Search Central forum.